World Heritage Group Publishes Official Pomona Bird List

#EdenProjectNorth #LovePomona #LoveBirds #SavePomona #MecoS #ScienceAsRevolution #SalfordDocklandsProject

Photo: Male Northern Wheatear, Pomona, Salford Docklands, Spring 2014 (copyright: James Walsh @MancunianBirder)

The Manchester Ship Canal World Heritage Group today publishes the official Pomona Bird List

Compiled from the records of professional Greater Manchester Ecology Unit ecologists, birdwatchers, casual sightings, and with some support from the Greater Manchester Local Records Centre, the list illustrates that a large 100 species have now been recorded on Pomona

James Walsh, qualified ecologist and Chairman of the Manchester Ship Canal World Heritage Group says “This list is a very comprehensive documentation of the birds of Pomona, the urban peoples’ nature reserve on Salford Docklands, the list shows the high levels of biodiversity on the site, thanks to all the people who have worked so hard on Pomona, many people have put in a huge amount of hours ecological field work and have some superb records and photos to show for it”

“The list shows what a superb site Pomona is for wildlife, there are many breeding bird species such as Little Ringed Plover, Lapwing, Skylark and Song Thrush, and thousands of birds every year use the site to feed on their long migrations, it is an essential unofficial urban nature reserve for wildlife and people alike”

“The list also shows the love and passion people have for Pomona, respect to all the ecologists, birdwatchers and photographers”

“This list is more evidence that Pomona should be conserved and enhanced for biodiversity, an Eden Project North would achieve this function and be a large tourist attraction”

“The Salford Docklands are attracting growing numbers of ecotourists who are visiting to take part in events such as Birdwatching Cruises and Wildlife Walks, and the EcoTourism industry can provide sustainable jobs and growth in the Manchester area, an emerging industry that can benefit everyone”

“With the Paris Climate Talks just in 5 weeks time, all businesses and councils should be looking to transfer and invest in the green economy”

“An Eden Project North on Pomona could be a catalyst for the Northern green economy”

POMONA BIRD LIST

Whooper Swan

Mute Swan

Canada Goose

Pink-footed Goose

Mandarin

Mallard

Teal

Northern Pintail

Tufted Duck

Pochard

Goldeneye

Common Scoter

Cormorant

Little Egret

Grey Heron

Marsh Harrier

Kestrel

Sparrowhawk

Peregrine

Buzzard (aka The Salford Eagle)

Osprey

Moorhen

Oystercatcher

Little Ringed Plover (Schedule 1 species)

Ringed Plover

Lapwing (Northern Plover)

Dunlin

Jack Snipe

Snipe

Woodcock

Redshank

Common Sandpiper

Mediterranean Gull

Black-headed Gull

Common Gull

Lesser Black-backed Gull

Herring Gull

Great Black-backed Gull

Kittiwake

Common Tern

Feral Pigeon

Stock Dove

Collared Dove

Wood Pigeon

Ring-necked Parakeet

Short-eared Owl

Swift

Kingfisher

Great Spotted Woodpecker

Skylark

Sand Martin

Swallow

House Martin

Tree Pipit

Meadow Pipit

Grey Wagtail

Yellow Wagtail

Pied Wagtail

Bohemian Waxwing

Wren

Dunnock (Hedge Accentor)

Robin

Redstart

Whinchat

Stonechat

Northern Wheatear

Blackbird

Fieldfare

Song Thrush

Mistle Thrush

Grasshopper Warbler

Sedge Warbler

Reed Warbler

Lesser Whitethroat

Whitethroat

Garden Warbler

Blackcap

Chiffchaff

Willow Warbler

Goldcrest

Spotted Flycatcher

Long-tailed Tit

Coal Tit

Blue Tit

Great Tit

Jay

Magpie

Jackdaw

Carrion Crow

Raven

Starling

House Sparrow

Chaffinch

Goldfinch

Greenfinch

Siskin

Redpoll

Linnet

Bullfinch

Reed Bunting

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